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Appendix D

The Toss is the toss for choice of innings.

Before the toss is at any time before the toss on the day the match is expected to start or, in the case of a one-day match, on the day the match is due to take place.

Before the match is at any time before the toss, not restricted to the day on which the toss is to take place.

During the match is at any time after the toss until the conclusion of the match, whether play is in progress or not.

Conduct of the game includes any action relevant to the match at any time on any day of the match.

Implements of the game are the bat, the ball, the stumps and bails.

The field of play is the area contained within the boundary edge.

The square is a specially prepared area of the field of play within which the match pitch is situated.

The outfield is that part of the field of play between the square and the boundary edge.

Inside edge is the edge on the same side as the nearer wicket.

Behind in relation to stumps and creases is on the side further away from the stumps and creases at the other end of the pitch. Conversely, ‘in front of’ is on the side nearer to the stumps and creases at the other end of the pitch.

The place where the striker stands to receive a delivery from the bowler is the striker’s end only insofar as it identifies, independently of where the striker may subsequently move, one half of the field of play; the other half being the bowler’s end. The striker’s end is also referred to as the wicket-keeper’s end, in situations where the position of a batsman in relation to the wicket at that end is involved.

In front of the line of the striker’s wicket is in the area of the field of play in front of the imaginary line joining the fronts of the stumps at the striker’s end; this line to be considered extended in both directions to the boundary.

Behind the wicket is in the area of the field of play behind the imaginary line joining the backs of the stumps at the appropriate end; this line to be considered extended in both directions to the boundary.

Behind the wicket-keeper is behind the wicket at the striker’s end, as defined above, but in line with both sets of stumps and further from the stumps than the wicket-keeper.

A batsman’s ground – at each end of the pitch, the whole area of the field of play behind the popping crease is the ground at that end for a batsman.

Original end is the end where a batsman was when the ball came into play for that delivery.

Wicket he has left is the wicket at the end where a batsman was at the start of the run in progress.

Off side/on side – see diagram below

Diagram Appendix D


Over the wicket / round the wicket – If, as the bowler runs up between the wicket and the return crease, the wicket is on the same side as his bowling arm, he is bowling over the wicket. If the return crease is on the same side as his bowling arm, he is bowling round the wicket.

Umpire – where the description the umpire is used on its own, it always means ‘the bowler’s end umpire’ though this full description is sometimes used for emphasis or clarity. Similarly the umpires always means both umpires. An umpire and umpires are generalised terms. Otherwise, a fuller description indicates which one of the umpires is specifically intended.

Umpires together agree applies to decisions which the umpires are to make jointly, independently of the players.

Fielding side is the side currently fielding, whether or not play is in progress.

Member of the fielding side is one of the players nominated by the captain of the fielding side, or any authorised replacement for such nominated player.

Fielder is one of the 11 or fewer players who together compose the fielding side. This definition includes not only both the bowler and the wicket-keeper but also nominated players who are legitimately on the field of play, together with players legitimately acting as substitutes for absent nominated players. It excludes any nominated player who is absent from the field of play, or who has been absent from the field of play and who has not yet obtained the umpire’s permission to return.
A player going briefly outside the boundary in the course of discharging his duties as a fielder is not absent from the field of play nor, for the purposes of Law 2.5 (Fielder absent or leaving the field), is he to be regarded as having left the field of play.

Delivery swing is the motion of the bowler’s arm during which he normally releases the ball for a delivery.

Delivery stride is the stride during which the delivery swing is made, whether the ball is released or not. It starts when the bowler’s back foot lands for that stride and ends when the front foot lands in the same stride. The stride after the delivery stride is completed when the next foot lands, i.e. when the back foot of the delivery stride lands again.

The ball is struck/strikes the ball unless specifically defined otherwise, mean ‘the ball is struck by the bat’/‘strikes the ball with the bat’.

Rebounds directly/strikes directly and similar phrases mean ‘without contact with any fielder’ but do not exclude contact with the ground.

Runs disallowed/not scored.  A run to be disallowed is one that in Law should not have been taken.  It is not only to be cancelled but the batsmen are to be returned to their original ends.  A run not to be scored is not illegal, but one which in Law is not recognised as a proper run.  It is to be regarded as not existing, so that the question of cancellation does not arise.  It incurs no penalty other than the loss of the run.

External protective equipment is any visible item of apparel worn for protection against external blows.
For a batsman, items permitted are a protective helmet, external leg guards (batting pads), batting gloves and, if visible, forearm guards.
For a fielder, only a protective helmet is permitted, except in the case of a wicket-keeper, for whom wicket-keeping pads and gloves are also permitted.

A protective helmet is headwear made of hard material and designed to protect the head or the face or both.

Clothing – anything that a player is wearing, including such items as spectacles or jewellery, that is not classed as external protective equipment is classed as clothing, even though he may be wearing some items of apparel, which are not visible, for protection. A bat being carried by a batsman does not come within this definition of clothing.

The bat – the following are to be considered as part of the bat.
– the whole of the bat itself.
– the whole of a glove (or gloves) worn on the hand (or hands) holding the bat.
– the hand (or hands) holding the bat, if the batsman is not wearing a glove on that hand
or on those hands.

Hand for batsman or wicket-keeper shall include both the hand itself and the whole of a glove worn on the hand.

Held in batsman’s hand - Contact between a batsman’s hand, or glove worn on his hand, and any part of the bat shall constitute the bat being held in that hand.

Equipment – a batsman’s equipment is his bat as defined above, together with any external protective equipment he is wearing.
A fielder’s equipment is any external protective equipment that he is wearing.

Person – a player’s person is his physical person (flesh and blood) together with any clothing or legitimate external protective equipment that he is wearing except, in the case of a batsman, his bat.
A hand, whether gloved or not, that is not holding the bat is part of the batsman’s person.
No item of clothing or equipment is part of the player’s person unless it is attached to him.
For a batsman, a glove being held but not worn is part of his person.
For a fielder, an item of clothing or equipment he is holding in his hand or hands is not part of his person.

© Marylebone Cricket Club 2013


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